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Dalhousie Law Journal

Abstract

The term "law reform" has a positive connotation. It indicates that those engaged in the process are at least optimistic to the extent that law can indeed be reformed and not merely changed. A variety of legislative shapes and administrative forms of law reform agencies has been created in this country over the last ten years. The objectives of law reform have been widely discussed in law review articles and in the daily press. There emerges a sense that reforming the law by way of a permanent law reform commission is a viable endeavour. Yet there is some difference of opinion about the approach to be taken and the objectives to be achieved. The words "law reform" have different meanings depending upon one's point of view. An attempt is made here to illustrate three points of view, each having important ramifications in terms of the work undertaken and the goals achieved. Three simplistic hypothetical models are put forward in order to highlight, in a broad way, different meanings attributed to the term "law reform". In addition, the activities of the Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan will be outlined.

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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