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Dalhousie Law Journal

Authors

Yoram Dinstein

Abstract

The rapid development of science and technology, particularly in the last generation, has had a tremendous impact on human rights. Many, perhaps most, human rights are adversely affected - in actuality or potentiality - by modern machines.' The subject has been discussed at great length by scientists and statesmen, lawyers and laymen, preachers and futurologists. But, to understand it in its proper perspective, it is believed that a typological approach is called for. It is necessary to distinguish between four different types of cases, in accordance with the nature of the relationship between science and technology, on the one hand, and human rights, on the other. The relationship may be subsumed under four alternative headings: (i) Science and technology may be at the root of a human rights problem and, at the same time, at the root of its solution. (ii) Science and technology may be neither at the root of a human rights problem nor at the root of its solution. (iii) Science and technology may not be at the root of a human rights problem, yet may be at the root of its solution. (iv) Science and technology may be at the root of a human rights problem without being at the root of its solution.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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