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Dalhousie Law Journal

Authors

H. W. Arthurs

Abstract

If the history of Canadian legal education should ever be written, these years of the mid-1970s will surely be viewed as a period of critical significance. For at least a quarter-century, growth has been the predominant theme: growth in student numbers and faculty complements; growth in democratic decision-making by both faculty and students, but also - inevitably - in the bureaucratic structures of faculties; growth of physical facilities and indeed, of whole new faculties; growth of libraries and of the pace and variety of research; growth of curricula and of teaching methods; growth in professional esteem and in public contribution; and - I believe - growth in quality throughout the entire system of legal education.

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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